Advertising, Article, Awards, Best Practices, Business, Consumer, Creative, Guyana, Industry

See how the creative process unfolds at Tactical Branding (Guyana). Access the article by clicking the link below.

Tactical Branding (Guyana) has been featured in this year's edition of the Services Scoop; a Caribbean based, regionally circulated trade magazine. Catch the article and find out 'how we get things done behind the scenes' here in Guyana. Just click http://issuu.com/cnsc/docs/services_scoop_2014_-_final/44
Tactical Branding (Guyana) has been featured in this year’s edition of the Services Scoop; a Caribbean based, regionally circulated trade magazine. Catch the article and find out ‘how we get things done behind the scenes’ here in Guyana. Just click http://issuu.com/cnsc/docs/services_scoop_2014_-_final/44
Advertising, Best Practices, Business, Consumer, Guyana, Industry, Shock

Are you ‘for or against’ Shock Advertising?

An excerpt from Wikipedia states:

Shock advertisements can be shocking and offensive for a variety of reasons, and violation of social, religious, and political norms can occur in many different ways. They can include a disregard for tradition, law or practice (e.g., lewd or tasteless sexual references or obscenity), defiance of the social or moral code (e.g., vulgarity, brutality, nudity, feces, or profanity) or the display of images or words that are horrifying, terrifying, or repulsive (e.g., gruesome or revolting scenes, or violence). Some advertisements may be considered shocking, controversial or offensive not because of the way that the advertisements communicate their messages but because the products themselves are “unmentionables” not to be openly presented or discussed in the public sphere. Examples of these “unmentionables” may include cigarettes, feminine hygiene products, or contraceptives. However, there are several products, services or messages that could be deemed shocking or offensive to the public. For example, advertisements for weight loss programs, sex/gender related products, clinics that provide AIDS and STD testing, funeral services, groups that advocate for less gun control, casinos which naturally support and promote gambling could all be considered controversial and offensive advertising because of the products or messages that the advertisements are selling. Shocking advertising content may also entail improper or indecent language, like French Connection‘s “fcuk” campaign.

Business

Facebook Business Pages vs. Websites

Do you believe Facebook Business Pages steal the thunder from traditional websites, given its amazing ease of interaction with users and consumers? Worse, do you see websites being replaced by them all together? What does the future hold? Let’s hear your thoughts!

Business

Advertising legends who walked on water | Pt. 2

“Decide what ‘image’ you want for your brand. Image means personality. Products, like people, have personalities, and they can make or break them in the market place.” David Ogilvy

“There is no such thing as a Mass Mind. The Mass Audience is made up of individuals, and good advertising is written always from one person to another. When it is aimed at millions it rarely moves anyone.” Fairfax Cone

“The more facts you tell, the more you sell. An advertisement’s chance for success invariably increases as the number of pertinent merchandise facts included in the advertisement increases.” Dr. Charles Edwards

“I have a theory that the best ads come from personal experience. Some of the good ones I have done have really come out of the real experience of my life, and somehow this has come over as true and valid and persuasive.” David Ogilvy

“The truth isn’t the truth until people believe you, and they can’t believe you if they don’t know what you’re saying, and they can’t know what you’re saying if they don’t listen to you, and they won’t listen to you if you’re not interesting, and you won’t be interesting unless you say things imaginatively, originally, freshly.” William Bernbach

“Ice cubes likely sell more alcohol for the distilling industry than attractive models in cheesecake poses. The inconspicuous ice cubes often hide the invisible sell – invisible, that is, to the conscious mind.” Wilson Bryan Key

“I have learned to respect ideas, wherever they come from. Often they come from clients. Account executives often have big creative ideas, regardless of what some writers think.” Leo Burnett

“Creative without strategy is called ‘art.’ Creative with strategy is called ‘advertising.'” Jef I. Richards

“Creativity is an advertising agency’s most valuable asset, because it is the rarest.” Jef I. Richards

Advertising, Business, Consumer, Industry

Benefits of Advertising in a Down Economy

Businesses that continue to advertise regardless of economic times have a competitive advantage over businesses that trim their ad budgets.

So says a business-to-business (b-to-b) media study conducted by Yankelovich Partners and Harris Interactive. The study showed more than 85 percent of business executives believe advertising during a down economy is extremely important.

B-to-b media is an undisputed ally for advertisers seeking to reach executives about products and services for their businesses. The study, prepared for American Business Media, showed that despite slow economic times, executives rely on b-to-b media for information more than any other media source for the influence or support of purchase decisions.

Competitive advantage
Advertising during a sluggish economy clearly creates a competitive advantage, according to the study, with a majority of executives agreeing that seeing a company advertise during slower times makes them feel more positive about the company’s commitment to its products and services. But perhaps most important is staying at the top of buyers’ minds when purchase decisions are made.

“For advertisers interested in maximum profit from their investment in b-to-b media, these research results indicate that advertising frequently ­ and capitalizing on the synergistic effect of print, Web sites, blogs, e-mail ads and trade shows ­ is a sure path to increasing awareness, interest and purchase,” said the study authors.

Add to that the fact that there have been dramatic increases in the time executives spend online and that online advertising is a winning strategy. Moreover, the study findings are consistent across industry sectors, making results relevant regardless of business category.

Long-term investing
While the Yankelovich/Harris study offers compelling data to support the benefit of advertising especially in slower times, other business gurus also support the theory.

“Advertising in a down economy is even more important than advertising during the good times,” says Joyce Gioia, president of the Herman Group, a firm of strategic business futurists in Greensboro, N.C. “That’s when you can build market share. That’s when you have less competition for share of mind. While others are in a cocoon, hibernating until things blow over, it’s a great time to invest in your business.”

Gioia says sign industry suppliers need to establish themselves as the brand of choice and halting advertising during tough times is counteractive to that goal.

The bottom line is clear: If a company is not communicating with customers when they enter the market, then that company will not be considered in the buying decision. That fundamental truth does not change, regardless of the economy.

While many companies readily understand the value of short-term advertising ­ generating new sales, generating repeat business from existing customers and generating new leads that turn into future sales ­ it can be more difficult to comprehend the long-term value. Think of a snowball rolling down a mountain ­ consistent advertising has a cumulative effect. The more familiar buyers are with your brand, the more likely they are to purchase the brand.

A useful excerpt from Jennifer LeClaire

Business

Rest in peace David.

Voiceovergy joins the entire Advertising Community in extending its deepest condolences to the family and employees of the late David King.

David, a long standing advertising man, never failed to remain optimistic in the line of his profession. He was good at heart, had a candid sense of humor and always brought joy and laughter to the people around him.

His contribution to advertising in Guyana will forever be remembered.

Rest in peace David. Now is your chance to crack some jokes in heaven (and if you get the time, put in a good word for your other Advertising Fellows down here, will you?).

:: sharon

Business

Advertising legends who walked on water | Pt. 1

“Advertising is the foot on the accelerator, the hand on the throttle, the spur on the flank that keeps our economy surging forward.” – Robert W. Sarnoff

“The agency’s account executive should be able to step into the sales manager’s shoes if the sales manager drops dead today.” – Morris Hite

“I have learned that you can’t have good advertising without a good client, that you can’t keep a good client without good advertising, and no client will ever buy better advertising than he understands or has an appetite for.” – Leo Burnett

“It is important to admit your mistakes, and to do so before you are charged with them. Many clients are surrounded by buckpassers who make a fine art of blaming the agency for their own failures. I seize the earliest opportunity to assume the blame.” – David Ogilvy

“I have learned that trying to guess what the boss or the client wants is the most debilitating of all influences in the creation of good advertising.” – Leo Burnett

To advertisers: “Do not compete with your agency in the creative area. Why keep a dog and bark yourself?” – David Ogilvy

“If each of us hires people who are smaller than we are, we shall become a company of dwarfs. But if each of us hires people who are bigger than we are, we shall become a company of giants.” – David Ogilvy

“Too many ads that try not to go over the reader’s head end up beneath his notice.” – Leo Burnett

“People are very sophisticated about advertising now. You have to entertain them. You have to present a product honestly and with a tremendous amount of pizzazz and flair, the way it’s done in a James Bond movie. But you can’t run the same ad over and over again. You have to change your approach constantly to keep on getting their attention . . . .” – Mary Wells Lawrence

“The greatest thing to be achieved in advertising, in my opinion, is believability, and nothing is more believable than the product itself.” – Leo Burnett

::sharon